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    The weekend event is set around a weekend invitation by the Dauphin of France to seventy or so likely courtiers who could be influential in France with the right contacts. The Dauphin has promised to take the ten most influential people with him to meet the King the following weekend, but only the top ten.


    How do we judge who the most influential people are?

    Social status.

    Social Status Overview

    At the beginning of the weekend, everyone in attendance will have equal social status. You are all equally worthless in the eyes of the Dauphin! It is by your actions over the course of the weekend that you can influence your social status, and you can track how high up the pecking order you've managed by looking at where you're seated for each meal - there will be a seating plan put together by the Dauphin's staff, with those higher in status at the top of the table, and those lower in status at the bottom.

    Gaining and Losing Social Status

    There are two ways in which you can gain or lose social status. Either you can roleplay (servants/refs will be dotted around to try to pick up on this, but feel free to call one over if you think they might have missed some awesome roleplaying), or you can use the game mechanics to help. Le Deuxième État is open to multiple forms of play, and both or a combination of the two are all equally valid.

    Gaining Social Status

    You can gain large amounts of social status by:

    • Furthering your personal objectives through roleplay or resources
    • Furthering your faction or secret society objectives through roleplay or resources
    • At the discretion of the referees

    You can gain moderate amounts of social status by:

    • Your rival loses social status
    • Your friend gains social status
    • Your faction or secret society's goals are furthered by another
    • At the discretion of the referees

    You can gain small amounts of social status by:

    • 'Burning' otherwise irrelevant resources - flashing the cash, marrying the girl, putting your name on everyones lips.
    • At the discretion of the referees

    Losing Social Status

    You can lose large amounts of social status by:

    • Having your dirty secret proven in public
    • Being outed as a member of a secret society
    • Accusing somebody wrongly of being a member of a secret society
    • Note that losses in social status are greatly increased if you are already in the top ten seats at the table. You are in the public eye.

    You can lose moderate amounts of social status by:

    • Your friend loses social status
    • Your rival furthers their personal objectives
    • At the discretion of the referees

    You can lose small amounts of social status by:

    • At the discretion of the referees

    Warning Phrases

    "Do you think/feel that is appropriate, monsieur/madame?"

    While we aim for an 18th century feel, we do not expect every player to memorise the myriad of social faux pas possible in 1750. As such, if we feel that your character is behaving in a way which should result in loss of social status, a servant will use the key phrase, "Do you think/feel that is appropriate, monsieur/madame?" to warn you, the player, that your character may be standing into danger. It is then up to you if you choose to continue or back off. Where possible, the servants will try to offer an appropriate way out which will save face.